Saturday, March 25, 2017

 

The Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program will host a webinar series on AMOC Mechanisms and Decadal Prediction, beginning November 2016. This series is based on recently funded projects in this area. Selected projects in this competition focused on multi-model analyses and experimentation that sought to better understand the mechanisms of AMOC variability and predictability in different models.


You only need to register once for the entire AMOC Mechanisms and Decadal Prediction series. If you would like to be added to the email list for updates on future CVP webinar series, please fill out the form at the bottom of this page. Signing up for the email list is separate from registering for this current series of webinars. These webinars will be recorded and the video will be available on this page after the presentation. We look forward to your participation in this series.

For questions about the webinar series, please contact Hunter Jones (hunter.jones@noaa.gov).

AMOC Mechanisms and Decadal Predictability 
Date/Time Title & Presenters (presenting investigator listed first)

Thursday
3 November 2016
2pm

[Recording]

Low-Frequency North Atlantic Variability in the CESM Large Ensemble
Who Kim (UCAR); Ping Chang (Texas A&M); Gokhan Danabasoglu (NCAR)
[Slides]
Signature of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation in the North Atlantic Dynamic Sea Level
Jianjun Yin (University of Arizona)

Wednesday
9 November 2016
2pm

[Recording]

Investigation of AMOC in two GCMs using Linear Inverse Modeling
Cecile Penland (NOAA/ESRL); Douglas MacMartin (CalTech); Eli Tziperman (Harvard)
[Slides]
Suppression of AMOC variability at increased CO2
Douglas MacMartin (CalTech); Cecile Penland (NOAA/ESRL); Eli Tziperman (Harvard)
[Slides]
Modeling Effects of Greenland Ice Sheet Melting on Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) Variability and Predictability
Andreas Schmittner (Oregon State University)
[Slides]

Wednesday
16 November 2016
2pm

[Recording]

A Collaborative Multi-model Study: Understanding Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) Variability Mechanisms and their Impacts on Decadal Prediction (part 1)
Young-Oh Kwon (WHOI); Claude Frankignoul (IPSL/LOCEAN)
[Slides]
A Collaborative Multi-model Study: Understanding Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) Variability Mechanisms and their Impacts on Decadal Prediction  (part 2)
Yohan Ruprich-Robert (NOAA / GFDL / Princeton University); Rym Msadek (CNRS/Cerfacs), Frederic Castruccio (UCAR), Stephen Yeager (UCAR), Tom Delworth (NOAA/GFDL), Gokhan Danabasoglu (NCAR)
A Collaborative Multi-model Study: Understanding Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) Variability Mechanisms and their Impacts on Decadal Prediction  (part 3)
Stephen Yeager (UCAR); Alicia Karspeck (UCAR); Gokhan Danabasoglu (NCAR)

Monday
28 November 2016
2pm
[Recording]

South Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation: Pathways and Modes of Variability
Renellys Perez (University of Miami - RSMAS); Ricardo Matano (Oregon State University); Silvia L. Garzoli (University of Miami - RSMAS)
Predictability of North Atlantic Ocean Heat Content
Martha Buckley (George Mason University); Rui Ponte (AER); Jason Furtado (University of Oklahoma); Patrick Heimbach (MIT)

About Climate Variability & Predictability (CVP)

A vital part of CPO's Earth System Science and Modeling (ESSM) Division, the CVP Program supports research to provide a process-level understanding of the climate system through observation, modeling, analysis, and field studies. This understanding is needed to improve climate models and predictions so that scientists can better anticipate the impacts of future climate variability and change.  Learn more...

Contact Us

Sandy Lucas, CVP Program Manager
Email: sandy.lucas@noaa.gov
Phone: 301-734-1253

Hunter JonesCVP Program Specialist
Email: hunter.jones@noaa.gov
Phone: 301-734-1215


 

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