Meet the Divisions

The Climate Program Office (CPO) is uniquely poised at the intersection of NOAA’s science and service missions, the climate research community, and the broader climate enterprise, which enables it to lead a research agenda and forge partnerships that enhance society's ability to make effective decisions. In support of our mission, CPO’s activities are organized within four divisions.

Ocean Observing and Monitoring

Credit: Scripps Institution of Oceanography

The Ocean Observing and Monitoring Division (OOMD) sponsors thousands of ocean observing platforms and land-based sites in the Arctic that gather data year round. NOAA’s observations of the ocean—which covers 71% of Earth’s surface—improve our understanding of the ocean’s role in driving environmental changes worldwide. The information that OOMD supports is critical for understanding how changes in the ocean affect phenomena such as drought and hurricanes and assets such as coastal communities, infrastructure, and transportation. These observations serve as a foundation for the information our nation needs to reduce risks for its people, businesses, and assets. Learn more...

Earth System Science and Modeling

Credit NOAA

The Earth System Science and Modeling (ESSM) division is advancing scientific understanding of the climate system and improving prediction capabilities to show where and how natural variability could impact our nation. ESSM invests in cutting-edge research labs and universities around the country, supporting a unique and highly flexible research enterprise of process-level studies, climate phenomena predictability, model representations of key processes and prediction technologies, development of application products, and testing for research-to-operation transitions. This research enterprise proves critical for improving NOAA’s modeling and prediction capabilities, which ultimately help the nation to prepare for natural disasters. Learn more...

Climate and Societal Interactions

Credit: Pacific RISA

The Climate and Societal Interactions (CSI) Division improves resilience and preparedness in diverse socio-economic regions and sectors. Through competitive research programs, CSI invests in research networks that connect and align cutting-edge science with the most urgent needs of stakeholders. CSI’s programs leverage science from a wide range of sources to provide valuable insight for planning and preparedness, advance the use of local information in analyses and assessments, and build relationships that connect planning for today’s challenges with long term preparedness. Learn more...

 

Communication, Education, and Engagement

Credit: The Wild Center

The newly-formed Communication, Education, and Engagement Division (CEE) enhances public climate science literacy, helps people find and use climate data and decision-support tools, and helps communities and businesses make informed decisions and build resilience to extreme events. CEE employs a well-rounded team of science communication and education experts, who collaborate with other CPO divisions and programs, climate-relevant NOAA Line Offices, and the U.S. Global Change Research Program (and the 13 federal agencies comprising it), to engage the stakeholders and educators and publish content in NOAA Climate.gov, the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit, and other USGCRP products.

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CONTACT US

Climate Program Office
1315 East-West Hwy, Suite 1100
Silver Spring, MD 20910

CPO.webmaster@noaa.gov

ABOUT OUR ORGANIZATION

Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2011, the United States experienced a record high number (14) of climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 670 lives, caused more than 6,000 injuries, and cost $55 billion in damages. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.