Funded Projects Import

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Using a Co-development Process to Improve, Integrate and Encourage Use of Drought Information and Adaptive Management of Livestock Grazing on National Forests

Principal Investigator (s): Mitch McClaran (University of Arizona); Julie Brugger, Michael A. Crimmins, Larry D. Howery, James E. Sprinkle, and Douglas R. Tolleson.

Year Initially Funded: 2014

Sector: Agriculture (CWD)

Locatio: Western United States

Abstract:

This research project uses a co-development process (including advisory group, questionnaires, interviews and workshops) to facilitate these critical interactions among climate tool developers, ranchers, and Forest Service managers to identify 1) the most useful and feasible tools, 2) a process to more regularly apply ADAPT (an adaptive management procedure that can provide flexibility in the application of management practices). and 3) ways to integrate the climate tools with the ADAPT procedure.

Publication:

Annual Project Report: McClaran June 2015 PRpt.pdf

Coping with Drought in California's Russian River Watershed

Principal Investigator (s): Marty Ralph, Dan Cayan (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); Mike Dettinger, Lorraine Flint (USGS), Jay Jasperse (SCWA)

Year Initially Funded: 2014

Sector: Extreme Events

Locatio: California Russian River (CWD)

Abstract:

The combination of flood risk with sustained drought conditions represents a major challenge to water managers, agriculture, endangered species and tourism in the area and there are worries that such extremes will become more common.  The project engages the lead water management agency in the region (SCWA), the Russian River NIDIS Pilot Activity group and a team of scientific experts to provide advances in understanding drought that will meet stakeholder needs for drought preparedness and risk reduction.

Publication:

Annual Project Report: Ralph June 2015 ProgressRpt.pdf

Developing a Basin-Wide Framework for Drought Forecasting and Planning in the Chesapeake Bay Region

Principal Investigator (s): Josh Weiss (Hazen and Sawyer); Richard Palmer (University of Massachusetts); John Balay (Susquehanna River Bay Commission); Clark Howells (Baltimore Department of Public Works)

Year Initially Funded: 2014

Sector: Coping With Drought

Locatio: Chesapeake Bay Region

Abstract:

The research team will develop a Drought Planning Tool for the Susquehanna River Basin that integrates drought early warning indices, hydrologic forecasts, and  a system operations model to inform and guide proactive responses to projected near- and medium-term dry periods. The Tool will serve as a framework for developing and applying quantitative drought predictions for regional-scale drought planning, focused on early warning triggers for proactive drought impact mitigation measures.

Publication:

Annual Project Report: Weiss June 2015Prpt.docx

Using Critical Thresholds to Customize Climate Projections of Extreme Events to User Needs and Support Decisions

Principal Investigator (s): Alexander Petersen (Adaptation International); Gregg Garfin, Mark Shafer, Katharine Hayhoe, Karen MacClune

Year Initially Funded: 2014

Sector: Urban (SARP-Water)

Locatio: N/A

Abstract:

The PIs propose to pilot and test a methodology for a participatory process to identify locally relevant critical thresholds for extreme events, and use these thresholds to customize climate projections to community-specific needs. 

Publication:

Annual Project Report: PetersenPRpt (2014).pdf

Climate Change and Water Availability: Evaluating and Mitigating Risks in the Electric Power Sector

Principal Investigator (s): Paulina Jaramillo, Kelly Klima, Haibo Zhai (Carnegie Mellon); Bart Nijssen (University of Washington);

Year Initially Funded: 2014

Sector: Energy

Locatio: Southeast United States

Abstract:

The PIs seek to improve information on the risks and opportunities that result from changes in climate and weather extremes to the Southeastern US power sector (i.e., the Southern Electric Reliability Council, or SERC). They will: (1) focus on climate, and ask how local hydrology and thus water availability will be affected by climate change and related extreme weather events; (2) examine how these changes in climate and water availability will affect the operations of existing and future power systems; and (3) examine the costs and benefits of technically feasible climate adaptation investments in the power system.

Publication:

Annual Project Report: Jaramillio April 2015 PRpt.pdf

Balancing Severe Decision Conflicts under Climate Extremes in Water Resource Management

Principal Investigator (s): Lisa Dilling & Kasprzyk, Rangwala, Gordon, Averyt (University of Colorado; Kaatz, Basdekas (Colorado Springs Utilities)

Year Initially Funded: 2014

Sector: Water Resources (SARP-Water)

Locatio: Colorado Front Range

Abstract:

The PIs seek to explore the production and implementation of a promising new multiobjective decision support framework by working with Colorado water utilities to co-produce a testbed tool and decision making experiment. The tool will be used to balance conflicting management objectives for water planning under climate extremes and determine how policy alternatives perform under severe climate uncertainty. By combining innovative search algorithms, simulation models, and interactive visualizations, the proposed decision tool efficiently generates and evaluates new alternatives, promotes managers’ learning about system tradeoffs and vulnerabilities, and can support more informed decisions in anticipation of future extreme events. Working with utilities to design and test the framework will enable researchers to learn about opportunities and barriers to incorporating this new tool, and new information in general, into the water management decision making process.
 

Publication:

Annual Project Report: Dilling (6.2015).docx

Flood and Drought Risk Management Under Climate Change: Methods for Strategy Evaluation and Cost Optimization

Principal Investigator (s): Edwin Welles (Deltares USA); Matthijs Lemans (Deltares Netherlands), Laurens Bouwer, Jarl Kind, Marjolein Mens; Tommy Strowd, . Jayantha Obeysekera (South Florida Water Mangement District)

Year Initially Funded: 2014

Sector: Urban

Locatio: Florida Everglades and adjoining urbanized areas such as Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Palm Beaches

Abstract:

Development of economically efficient and sustainable water management strategies hinges on the assessment of the costs of weather extremes, in particular damages due to floods and droughts and their mitigation, as well as the framework in which the costs for adaptation and the benefits of damage reduction are weighted.  A risk-based cost-benefit method will be developed for a portfolio of potential measures brought together in adaptation strategies, focusing on flood and drought impacts in the South Florida region. 

 

Publication:

Annual Project Report: Welles April 2015 PRpt.pdf

An Interactive and Participatory Web-based Optimization Tool for Supporting Community Learning and Collaborative Design of Adaptation Action Plans in Watersheds.

Principal Investigator (s): Meghana Babbar-Sebens (Oregon State University); Kristen Macuga, Senhasis Mukhopadhyay (Indiana University)

Year Initially Funded: 2014

Sector: Water Resources (SARP-Water)

Locatio: Central Indiana

Abstract:

The climate-focused WRESTORE tool developed in this project will advance the goals of stakeholders interested in long-term planning for water resources in Indiana, and elsewhere. By allowing individual stakeholders to participate via a web-based interface.  The proposed study will also provide valuable insights into how human attitudes and learning can be included in adaptation models.  

Publication:

Annual Project Report: BabberSebens.pdf

Predicting Water Quality Extremes using Season-ahead Climate Information

Principal Investigator (s): Paul Block (University of Wisconsin); Arun Kumar (NOAA, NWS-CPC), Upmanu Lall

Year Initially Funded: 2014

Sector: Urban (SARP-Water)

Locatio: Lake Mendota (Madison, WI)

Abstract:

The PIs propose to develop probabilistic season-ahead water quality outlooks by associating large-scale climate variable states and predictions with local watershed conditions.  Particular emphasis will be placed on predicting extreme conditions, which typically exemplify poor water quality

Publication:

Annual Project Report: Block May 2015 PRpt.pdf

Informing Emergency and Risk Management Climate Knowledge in Arid Regions

Principal Investigator (s): Nalini Chhetri (Arizona State University), Anthony Cox (Arizona Dept. of Emergency & Military Affairs); Nancy Selover, Kenneth Galluppi (ASU)

Year Initially Funded: 2014

Sector: Energy

Locatio: Arid Regions (e.g. Arizona)

Abstract:

The PIs propose to:  1) understand how local and regional emergency management communities function so that climate science knowledge can be effectively infused into their risk management decision processes, and 
2) develop a framework for identifying products and services that can deliver needed knowledge about climate extremes threats and impacts, and resulting risk in order to prioritize mitigation and adaptation efforts

Publication:

Annual Project Report: Chhetri (4.2015).pdf

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