Tropical Convection Webinars

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Looking for the concurrently running Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) webinar series?

The Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program will host a webinar series on Understanding & Improving Prediction of Tropical Convection, beginning October 2016. This series is based on recently funded projects in this area. Selected projects in this competition used data collected during the DYNAMO field campaign in modeling and analysis studies in order to improve understanding and representation of the physical processes deemed to be critical to the initiation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation: the interaction between convection and environmental moisture, and the dynamic evolution of clouds, and and air-sea interactions.

You may register once for the entire Understanding & Improving Prediction of Tropical Convection series.

Sign up to learn of future CVP Webinars.

These webinars will be recorded and the video will be available on this page after the presentation. We look forward to your participation in this series.

For questions about the webinar series, please contact Hunter Jones ( hunter.jones@noaa.gov).

Understanding & Improving Prediction of Tropical Convection 
Date/Time Title & Presenters (presenting investigator listed first)

Tuesday
4 October 2016
2pm
[Recording]

A Quantitative Analysis of Convective Mass Flux Parameterizations Using Direct Observations from DYNAMO
Chris Fairall (NOAA/ESRL); Alan Brewer (NOAA/ESRL)
[Abstract] [Slides]

Tuesday
11 October 2016
2pm

Potential roles of the ITCZ and Maritime Continent in MJO initiation
Chidong Zhang (U. Miami)
[Abstract] [Full recording unavailable due to technical difficulties. See Maloney recording for last 10 minutes.]
Use of the Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Model (OLAM) with Cloud System-Resolving Refined Local Mesh to Study MJO Initiation
Eric Maloney (Colorado S.); Robert Walko (U. Miami)
[Recording - First 10 minutes are from presentation by Chidong Zhang.]

Tuesday
25 October 2016
2pm
[Recording]

Convective Development and Organization Associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) from a Multiscale Interaction Perspective During the DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation) field campaign
Kazuyoshi Kikuchi (U. Hawaii); George Kiladis (NOAA/ESRL/PSD)
MJO Evolution as Revealed by Multivariate Principal Oscillation Analysis
Leslie Hartten (CIRES & NOAA/ESRL/PSD); Cecile Penland (NOAA/ESRL/PSD);  Rosa M. Vargas (Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS) Program & University of Puerto Rico - Mayagüez)
[Slides]

Tuesday
1 November 2016
2pm

[Recording]

Interrogating Tropical Cold Pools with DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation) Observations and Modeling
Paquita Zuidema (U. Miami); Steve Krueger (U. Utah); Simon de Szoeke (Oregon S.); Alan Brewer (NOAA/ESRL)
Intraseasonal variability of the upper ocean in the Seycelles-Chagos Thermocline Ridge Region and its impact on Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) initiation and development
Saulo Soares (U. Hawaii); Kelvin Richards (U. Hawaii)[Slides]

Tuesday
15 November 2016
2pm

[Recording]

Understanding and Improving Global Climate Model Simulations of Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Initiation over the Tropical Indian Ocean using DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation) Field Observations
Hailan Wang (SSAI & NASA); Siegfried Schubert (NASA); Leo Donner (NOAA/GFDL)
Estimating convection’s moisture sensitivity: a model-observation synthesis using DYNAMO data
Brian Mapes (U. Miami); Paquita Zuidema (U. Miami); Zhiming Kuang (Harvard)

Thursday
17 November 2016
2pm

[Recording]

A genesis potential index for Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) modulation of tropical cyclone genesis
Bin Wang (U. Hawaii)
Quantifying feedbacks between convection and radiation during the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) using DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation) observations and climate models
Simon de Szoeke (Oregon State University)

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Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2011, the United States experienced a record high number (14) of climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 670 lives, caused more than 6,000 injuries, and cost $55 billion in damages. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.