Comparing Two Generations of Climate Model Simulations and Projections of Regional Climate Processes for North America 9 October 2015

Comparing Two Generations of Climate Model Simulations and Projections of Regional Climate Processes for North America

A technical report produced by the NOAA CMIP5 Task Force analyzes how CMIP5--the latest generation of climate model simulations--compares to CMIP3 simulations and projections of regional climate processes for North America.

Researchers call for greater consideration of the human impacts on water stress in Nature commentary 21 September 2015

Researchers call for greater consideration of the human impacts on water stress in Nature commentary

Researchers from OAR and the University of California system, including Amir AghaKouchak, David Feldman, and Travis Huxman (University of California, Irvine) as well as Martin Hoerling (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory) and Jay Lund (University of California, Davis), recently published an essay in Nature discussing the future implications for California and other regions with growing populations and industries of the growing demand humans are placing on water.
How has the concurrence of drought and heatwaves in the U.S. changed over time? 9 September 2015

How has the concurrence of drought and heatwaves in the U.S. changed over time?

Research by Omid Mazdiyasni and Amir AghaKouchak (University of California, Irvine) titled, "Substantial increase in concurrent droughts and heatwaves in the United States" was recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). 
Summer Oscillations in Tropical Thunderstorm Activity: Potential Sources of Predictability 21 July 2015

Summer Oscillations in Tropical Thunderstorm Activity: Potential Sources of Predictability

 A new Climate Program Office-sponsored study published in the journal Climate Dynamics and led by Drs. Sun-Seon Leon and Bin Wang from the University of Hawaii has identified the characteristic wind and cloud variations associated with the two main areas of thunderstorm activity over the Indian Ocean and West Pacific that make up the BSISO.
Major new study links extreme temperatures trends to changes in Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation patterns 13 July 2015

Major new study links extreme temperatures trends to changes in Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation patterns

A new NOAA Climate Program Office-sponsored study on extreme temperatures has been published in the prestigious academic journal Nature. The article describes how changes in the frequency of certain atmospheric circulation patterns are linked to observed changes in the frequency of regional temperature extremes during recent decades.
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Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2011, the United States experienced a record high number (14) of climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 670 lives, caused more than 6,000 injuries, and cost $55 billion in damages. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.

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