Climate Program Office News

WaPo: Heat wave creates health hazard in southwestern US 19 June 2017

WaPo: Heat wave creates health hazard in southwestern US

By Clarice Silber and Josh Hoffner | AP

PHOENIX — The southwestern U.S. is about to feel the wrath of a punishing heat wave that includes a forecast of 120 degrees (48.8 Celsius) in Phoenix — a temperature not seen in the desert city in more than 20 years.

The broiling temperatures will also be felt in Las Vegas and Southern California, creating a public health hazard. Rising temps are being closely watched by everyone from airline pilots and emergency room doctors to power grid managers and mountain cities unaccustomed to heat waves.

Even cities accustomed to dealing with 110-degree (43-Celsius) days are grappling with the new problems that arise from 120 degrees (48.8 Celsius).

LA Times: When it comes to Southern California's heat wave, the worst is yet to come 19 June 2017

LA Times: When it comes to Southern California's heat wave, the worst is yet to come

By David Zahniser and Ruben Vives

Firefighters labored in scorching heat Sunday against five separate brush fires across Southern California as forecasters warned of more triple-digit temperatures in inland communities.

The punishing heat wave broke records on Sunday in Lancaster, Palmdale and Sandberg, which saw highs of 108, 108 and 99 degrees, respectively. With a dry, high-pressure system parked over the Southwest, temperatures are expected to keep climbing through midweek, according to the National Weather Service.

Mashable: A record-smashing heat wave will scorch the southwestern U.S. 19 June 2017

Mashable: A record-smashing heat wave will scorch the southwestern U.S.

BY MARIA GALLUCCI

A brutal heat wave is expected to scorch the southwestern U.S. this week, with some cities likely to see all-time record high temperatures.

The National Weather Service (NWS) said this will likely be one of the most intense heat waves seen in many years across desert Southwest, including parts of California, Arizona, Nevada, and Utah.

High temperatures could climb well above 110 degrees each day for the next week across the area. Many desert locations, including Tucson and Phoenix, could reach the 120-degrees Fahrenheit mark on Tuesday or Wednesday, followed by a slow decline in temperatures in days to come.

Protecting Outdoor Workers from Extreme Heat 6 June 2017

Protecting Outdoor Workers from Extreme Heat

NOAA and OSHA data combined to understand heat exposure for outdoor workers

Many outdoor workers get uncomfortably warm during the hot days of summer. As employers are responsible for providing a safe workplace, they need to know when uncomfortable becomes unhealthy.

Predictions for the summer of 2017 show most of the contiguous United States has elevated chances for warmer-than-average temperatures. The summer outlook map and other forecasts in this Web app can help outdoor workers and their supervisors understand heat hazards, keep workers safe and productive, and even save lives.

Record heat possible in Washington region Wednesday and Thursday 16 May 2017

Record heat possible in Washington region Wednesday and Thursday

Washington Post, By Jason Samenow

The area’s first heat wave of 2017 is set to start Wednesday. Between Wednesday and Friday, high temperatures should range between 88 and 94 degrees, placing several long-standing records in jeopardy. At the heat wave’s peak intensity Thursday, it will feel as hot as the mid-to-upper 90s factoring in midsummer-like humidity. Throughout the heat wave, temperatures will be about 15 degrees above normal.

RSS

About the Climate Program Office

The Climate Program Office (CPO) manages competitive research programs in which NOAA funds high-priority climate science, assessments, decision support research, outreach, education, and capacity-building activities designed to advance our understanding of Earth’s climate system, and to foster the application of this knowledge in risk management and adaptation efforts.  CPO-supported research is conducted in regions across the United States, at national and international scales, and globally.  Learn more...

«January 2018»
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
25262728293031
1234567
91011121314
1516182021
22232425262728
2930311234

ABOUT OUR ORGANIZATION

Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2011, the United States experienced a record high number (14) of climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 670 lives, caused more than 6,000 injuries, and cost $55 billion in damages. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.

CONTACT US

Climate Program Office
1315 East-West Hwy, Suite 1100
Silver Spring, MD 20910

CPO.webmaster@noaa.gov