Climate Program Office News

A new modeling approach to improve decadal climate predictions 24 February 2017

A new modeling approach to improve decadal climate predictions

This study highlights modeling techniques that may enhance predictability of decadal climate change and understanding of North American drought.

Will future global cloud changes amplify global warming? 3 March 2016

Will future global cloud changes amplify global warming?

A new paper supported by NOAA’s Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program describes where we are in understanding whether subtropical clouds (and the atmosphere above and below them) will act as a positive or negative feedback to global warming.

How has subtropical stratocumulus and associated meteorology changed since the 1980s? 17 September 2015

How has subtropical stratocumulus and associated meteorology changed since the 1980s?

Work supported by the Climate Program Office's Climate Observation Division (authors: C. Seethala, et al. from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography) has been published online for early release in the Journal of Climate.

CVP-funded research tests microphysical schemes in the WRF model 9 June 2015

CVP-funded research tests microphysical schemes in the WRF model

esearch supported by NOAA CPO’s Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Atmospheric Science. The paper by Li et al., "The sensitivity of simulated shallow cumulus convection and cold pools to microphysics," explores how two separate microphysical schemes (the Thompson and Morrison schemes) used in nested Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations affect the generation of precipitation and evaporation in the model.

New Satellite Cloud Datasets Produced 15 April 2015

New Satellite Cloud Datasets Produced

With partial funding from CPO's Climate Monitoring Division,  Researchers at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography have published new research applying important "corrections" to two widely-used, long term satellite cloud data records (The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) dataset and the Pathfinder Atmospheres–Extended (PATMOS-x) dataset).

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About the Climate Program Office

The Climate Program Office (CPO) manages competitive research programs in which NOAA funds high-priority climate science, assessments, decision support research, outreach, education, and capacity-building activities designed to advance our understanding of Earth’s climate system, and to foster the application of this knowledge in risk management and adaptation efforts.  CPO-supported research is conducted in regions across the United States, at national and international scales, and globally.  Learn more...

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ABOUT OUR ORGANIZATION

Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2011, the United States experienced a record high number (14) of climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 670 lives, caused more than 6,000 injuries, and cost $55 billion in damages. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.

CONTACT US

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