The North American Climate Services Partnership (NACSP)

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"Scenario Planning for Climate Adaptation" workshop along the U.S./Mexico border

  • 8 September 2014
  • Number of views: 3515

A bilateral workshop on "Scenario Planning for Climate Adaptation" in the Rio Grande-Rio Bravo region will take place September 10-11, 2014 at the U.S. International Boundary and Water Commission in El Paso,Texas.

This workshop will bring together natural resource managers, water managers, climatologists, ecologists, hydrologists, in order to explore the use of scenario planning methods to plan for situations of high uncertainty, such as those related to decade-to-century climate changes, and seasonal-to-interannual climate variations and their impacts on resources, management and society.

Representatives from both the U.S. and Mexico will attend, and three of NOAA/Climate Program Office’s (CPO) Regional Integrated Sciences & Assessments (RISA) programs participated in the workshop's planning and execution (CLIMAS, SCIPP and C-NAP). NOAA funding for the workshop was provided in part by the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) and the National Climatic Data Center at NESDIS.

This workshop is being conducted under the umbrella of the trilateral North American Climate Services Partnership (NACSP), of which OAR/CPO leads on behalf of the U.S. More information can be found here: http://www.environment.arizona.edu/gregg-garfin/rgb_workshop.

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Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2011, the United States experienced a record high number (14) of climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 670 lives, caused more than 6,000 injuries, and cost $55 billion in damages. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.