National Integrated Heat Health Information System

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NOAA and ESRI Team Up to Create New Tools for Heat Health Understanding, Planning, and Analysis for the GEO Plenary 10/23/2017 - 10/27/2017

NOAA and ESRI Team Up to Create New Tools for Heat Health Understanding, Planning, and Analysis for the GEO Plenary

A new set of visualizations and analytical tools to understand, prepare for, and respond to extreme heat and its human health impacts (including economic impacts), has been prepared as an ESRI Story Map, developed in cooperation with NOAA and the NIHHIS Interagency Working Group. The story map includes a number of powerful tools which can also be used as stand-alone analytical web apps. The collaboration will continue, and the tools will be refined over time. The story map will be unveiled officially at the upcoming GEO Plenary in Washington DC, the week of 23 October 2017, and we encourage any and all with interest in climate and health to attend the open sessions and side meetings on Monday and Tuesday of that week - particularly the GEO Health Community of Practice on Tuesday afternoon. For more information on the GEO plenary, visit: http://www.earthobservations.org/geo14.php

WaPo: Heat wave creates health hazard in southwestern US 19 June 2017

WaPo: Heat wave creates health hazard in southwestern US

By Clarice Silber and Josh Hoffner | AP

PHOENIX — The southwestern U.S. is about to feel the wrath of a punishing heat wave that includes a forecast of 120 degrees (48.8 Celsius) in Phoenix — a temperature not seen in the desert city in more than 20 years.

The broiling temperatures will also be felt in Las Vegas and Southern California, creating a public health hazard. Rising temps are being closely watched by everyone from airline pilots and emergency room doctors to power grid managers and mountain cities unaccustomed to heat waves.

Even cities accustomed to dealing with 110-degree (43-Celsius) days are grappling with the new problems that arise from 120 degrees (48.8 Celsius).

NOAA Releases Summer Climate Outlook for 2017 6 June 2017

NOAA Releases Summer Climate Outlook for 2017

only the great plains may be spared from above average temperatures

Schools are letting out, Memorial Day is nearly here, and for many Americans that means  the unofficial start of summer. And if it's summer, then it 's time to start paying attention to the risk of extreme heat. According to NOAA’s summer outlook, most of the United States is favored to have a hotter than average summer in 2017. Only in the Great Plains do forecasters think the chances for a cool or a normal summer are equal to the chances of a hot summer. Everywhere else—from Alaska to southern California, and from Maine to Texas—odds are tilted toward well above average warmth. The absolute highest chances for a much warmer than usual summer are in Hawaii. (see the large version of the map below for Hawaii and Alaska.

NIHHIS Partners host heat-health workshop in Hermosillo, Mexico 19 May 2017

NIHHIS Partners host heat-health workshop in Hermosillo, Mexico

The Climate Program Office's Juli Trtanj will deliver an update on the National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS)’s national and trans-boundary activities.  

CPO highlights 2016 milestones and achievements 16 May 2017

CPO highlights 2016 milestones and achievements

CPO is releasing its 2016 Annual Report, which gives an overview of FY16 achievements and highlights the great work done by CPO Divisions and Programs to advance scientific understanding of climate and improve society's ability to plan and respond.

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Contact NIHHIS

Juli Trtanj
Climate and Heat Health Lead
P: (301) 734-1214
E: juli.trtanj@noaa.gov

Hunter Jones (UCAR)
Special Projects Managert
P: (301) 734-1215
E: hunter.jones@noaa.gov

Sarah Giltz (Knauss Fellow)
Sea Grant Knauss Fellow
P: (301) 734-1214
E: sarah.giltz@noaa.gov

CONTACT US

Climate Program Office
1315 East-West Hwy, Suite 1100
Silver Spring, MD 20910

CPO.webmaster@noaa.gov

ABOUT OUR ORGANIZATION

Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2011, the United States experienced a record high number (14) of climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 670 lives, caused more than 6,000 injuries, and cost $55 billion in damages. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.