Women's History Month: A conversation with Dr. Elizabeth Barnes 26 March 2021

Women's History Month: A conversation with Dr. Elizabeth Barnes

In honor of Women's History Month, NOAA is highlighting a few of its female scientists and funded researchers who are making significant strides in the climate sciences and other science fields. The following interview is with Dr. Elizabeth Barnes, Associate Professor in the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University. Her research is funded in part by the NOAA Climate Program Office’s Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections (MAPP) Program. She focuses on climate variability and change, and how data science can help improve our understanding.

Scientists Explore Drivers of Marine Heatwaves in the Northwest Atlantic 14 March 2021

Scientists Explore Drivers of Marine Heatwaves in the Northwest Atlantic

Marine heatwaves are increasing, both in the amount of time they last and in their intensity. Because of their potential impacts on fisheries and other marine goods and services, scientists are working to understand and develop practical marine heatwave predictions.
Positive cloud feedback causing high sensitivity climate models to be less plausible for future climate projections 5 March 2021

Positive cloud feedback causing high sensitivity climate models to be less plausible for future climate projections

Cloud feedback refers to the response of clouds to surface temperature change. A positive cloud feedback would amplify greenhouse gas-induced warming and have a stronger cooling effect from aerosol‐cloud interactions. Uncertainties in predicting cloud feedbacks are the largest cause of spread in model predictions of future global warming.

A Seasonal Probabilistic Outlook for Tornadoes (SPOTter) in the U.S Using Tornadic Parameters 5 March 2021

A Seasonal Probabilistic Outlook for Tornadoes (SPOTter) in the U.S Using Tornadic Parameters

New research looks to expand severe weather outlooks beyond the synoptic weather time scale toward subseasonal-to-seasonal time scales.
Increasing Summertime Cloudiness May Lead to More Sea Ice Melt in the Arctic 3 March 2021

Increasing Summertime Cloudiness May Lead to More Sea Ice Melt in the Arctic

A recent study published in Nature Communications Earth & Environment suggests that summertime low clouds play an important role in driving sea ice melt. 

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