National Strategy Proposed to Respond to Climate Change's Impacts on Fish, Wildlife, Plants

  • 30 January 2012
National Strategy Proposed to Respond to Climate Change's Impacts on Fish, Wildlife, Plants
Map showing the eight Bering Sea communities that comprise CONAS and example of community-based observing network data
Fig. 11.1. (a, top) Map showing the eight Bering Sea communities that comprise CONAS (Community-based Observing Network for Adaptation and Security), an example of an operational CBON. (b, bottom) Example of community-based observing network data, in this case from CONAS and the village of Togiak, used to support decision-making with respect to walrus habitat.

In partnership with state, tribal, and federal agency partners, the Obama Administration has released the first draft national strategy to help decision makers and resource managers prepare for and help reduce the impacts of climate change on species, ecosystems, and the people and economies that depend on them.

The Strategy represents a draft framework for unified action to safeguard fish, wildlife and plants, as well as the important benefits and services the natural world provides the nation every day, including jobs, food, clean water, clean air, building materials, storm protection, and recreation.

The draft National Fish, Wildlife and Plants Climate Adaptation Strategy, available for public review and comment through March 5, 2012, can be found on the web at http://www.wildlifeadaptationstrategy.gov. The site provides information on submitting comments, and the dates/locations of five public information sessions and two webinars designed to provide details and encourage dialogue on the strategy and its development. 

To register for these meetings and for more information on the public comment process, visit http://www.wildlifeadaptationstrategy.gov/public-comments.php

Download the full press release.

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Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather.