Spring persistence, transition, and resurgence of El Niño 16 December 2014

Spring persistence, transition, and resurgence of El Niño

Research supported by CPO’s Modeling, Analysis, Prediction, and Projections (MAPP) program has been published in Geophysical Research Letters.  The study, titled "Spring Persistence, Transition and Resurgence of El Nino", by Sang-Ki Lee at the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies/NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in Miami, Florida, and coauthors, provides a comprehensive physical explanation of how two main types of El Niño events typically evolve from their onset to decay. 

Direct measurements of methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania 9 December 2014

Direct measurements of methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania

New research supported by the Climate Program Office's Atmospheric Chemistry, Carbon Cycle, & Climate (AC4) program was published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science on Dec. 8, 2014.

Researchers offer new insights into predicting future droughts in California 8 December 2014

Researchers offer new insights into predicting future droughts in California

This NOAA Drought Task Force/NIDIS report details the results of an extensive multi-research-group analysis of the causes and predictability of the drought. The report finds that the exceedingly warm and dry conditions that caused the drought were due to a high pressure ridge off the west coast of the United States influenced heavily by anomalous sea surface temperatures. These influences are attributed to natural variability.

The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit celebrates rollout 17 November 2014

The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit celebrates rollout

Using plain language and easy-to-use tools, the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit illustrates climate-related vulnerabilities that communities and businesses face, from national to local scales, and summarizes steps they can take to become more resilient.

New research shows ocean warming poses "immediate threat" to keystone reef-building coral in the Caribbean 6 November 2014

New research shows ocean warming poses "immediate threat" to keystone reef-building coral in the Caribbean

New research published in The Proceeding of the Royal Society - Biological Sciences provides new insights on the threat  ocean warming poses on coral growth in Mesoamerican barrier reefs.  The research, partially funded by CPO's Climate Monitoring program, used laboratory experiments to examine the adverse effects of ocean warming and acidification, and showed that the warming predicted by the IPCC for the end of the 21st century produced a five-fold decrease in coral calcification - the process by which corals produce calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and build reefs.

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ABOUT OUR ORGANIZATION

Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2017, the United States experienced a record-tying 16 climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 362 lives, and had significant economic effects on the areas impacted, costing more than $306 billion. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.

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