Ocean heatwaves dramatically shift habitats 5 August 2020

Ocean heatwaves dramatically shift habitats

“Thermal displacement” reflects how far species must go to follow preferred temperatures

Marine heatwaves across the world’s oceans can displace habitat for sea turtles, whales, and other marine life by 10s to thousands of kilometers. They dramatically shift these animals' preferred temperatures in a fraction of the time that climate change is expected to do the same, new research funded by NOAA's Climate Program Office shows.

New research identifies regions with worsening "snow droughts" around the world 3 August 2020

New research identifies regions with worsening "snow droughts" around the world

Western United States snowmelt deficit found to be of increasing intensity and length in recent years

Snow is used by approximately ⅙ of Earth’s population for drinking, agriculture, and hydropower, among other uses. Despite its importance, “snow droughts,” or deficits in snowmelt, which can have serious regional and global consequences, have been fairly unexplored compared to other forms of drought, until now.

Tracking fossil fuel emissions with carbon-14 1 June 2020

Tracking fossil fuel emissions with carbon-14

Researchers, funded in part by CPO's Atmospheric Chemistry, Carbon Cycle, and Climate Program (AC4), have devised a breakthrough method for estimating national emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuels using ambient air samples and a well-known isotope of carbon that scientists have relied on for decades to date archaeological sites.

Link between Earth’s heat and hurricane strength grows 20 May 2020

Link between Earth’s heat and hurricane strength grows

Longer period of record reveals increases in storm intensity

Researchers from NOAA and the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, funded by CPO's Climate Observations and Monitoring Program, have greater confidence that warming surface temperatures and increasing tropical cyclone intensity appear to go hand-in-hand.

Improving understanding of salinity’s role in rapid intensification of Atlantic tropical cyclones 10 April 2020

Improving understanding of salinity’s role in rapid intensification of Atlantic tropical cyclones

A research team funded in part by the Climate Program Office’s Climate Observations and Monitoring Program has published a new paper describing salinity’s significance in the rapid intensification of Atlantic tropical cyclones, and the possibility of improving our models for rapid intensification by including salinity.

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Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather.