Women's History Month: A conversation with Dr. Lucy Hutyra 26 March 2020

Women's History Month: A conversation with Dr. Lucy Hutyra

In honor of Women's History Month, NOAA is highlighting a few of its female scientists and funded researchers who are making significant strides in the climate sciences and other science fields. The following interview is with Dr. Lucy Hutyra, an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth and Environment at Boston University and CPO Atmospheric Chemistry, Carbon Cycle and Climate (AC4) Program-funded scientist. 

Different forces drive storm-induced sea level spikes on U.S. East, Gulf coasts, says CPO-funded study 13 February 2020

Different forces drive storm-induced sea level spikes on U.S. East, Gulf coasts, says CPO-funded study

Using a new powerful NOAA global climate model, NOAA and partner researchers show that big spikes in daily coastal sea levels will increase in the future from the Gulf Coast to the Atlantic coast as warming progresses, but will be driven by differing forces in these two regions.

NOAA launches major field campaign to improve weather and climate prediction 7 January 2020

NOAA launches major field campaign to improve weather and climate prediction

Today, scientists using multiple human-piloted and autonomous vehicles, buoys, radar, and computer modeling embarked on a six-week scientific campaign off the island of Barbados to investigate how the ocean, atmosphere, and shallow clouds work together to create the weather and climate we live in.

Bridging the Weather-Climate Prediction Skill Gap with a Multi-Model Experiment 18 December 2019

Bridging the Weather-Climate Prediction Skill Gap with a Multi-Model Experiment

Researchers have for years been working to tackle the subseasonal to seasonal (S2S) prediction problem to improve forecasts. The Subseasonal Experiment, SubX, is an interagency research-to-operations project designed to help tackle this problem. The results of the project were recently published in BAMS. 

Warming of the Indo-Pacific Ocean is changing global rainfall patterns 26 November 2019

Warming of the Indo-Pacific Ocean is changing global rainfall patterns

U.S. West and East Coast could see decline in rainfall

New research, funded by CPO's Climate Variability and Predictability Program, shows that warming of the Indo-Pacific Ocean is altering rainfall patterns from the tropics to the United States, contributing to declines in rainfall on the United States west and east coasts.

RSS
12345678910Last

CPO HEADQUARTERS

1315 East-West Highway Suite 100
Silver Spring, MD 20910

ABOUT US

Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather.