National Integrated Heat Health Information System

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NIHHIS to be showcased in Chile at WMO & WHO meeting on Integrated Information Systems for Extreme Heat

At the request of the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO), CPO’s Hunter Jones will travel to Chile to build NOAA and the National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) international partnership through the Global Heat Health Information Network (GHHIN). While there, he will work with members of the World Meteorological Organization, World Health Organization (including PAHO), the Chilean and Argentine Met services, as well as regional health experts, to develop a plan to pilot new climate services for heat health risk reduction in South America. In a workshop convened by PAHO and GHHIN from August 26-27 in Santiago, NIHHIS will be a model shared with attendees as part of a capacity and partnership building process. This engagement is a pilot for how national-regional integrated information systems such as NIHHIS can be scaled to other nations through GHHIN.

The meeting in Santiago is running as a follow-on after the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) annual Climate Symposium held from 20-22 August in Punta Arenas. This meeting, which has run since 2005, convenes climate scientists and policy makers to discuss cutting-edge science, share best practices, and advance policy. CPO’s Jones will also attend this meeting. CPC’s Arun Kumar will also be a delegate and will speak to “Global Infrastructure for Predicting Climate Variability and its Potential for Anticipating Changes in the Occurrence of Local Climate Extremes”.

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Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2017, the United States experienced a record-tying 16 climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 362 lives, and had significant economic effects on the areas impacted, costing more than $306 billion. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.