Climate Risk Areas Initiative News

Citizen Scientists Take to the Streets to Map the Hottest Places in Ten U.S. Cities 24 July 2019

Citizen Scientists Take to the Streets to Map the Hottest Places in Ten U.S. Cities

Citizen scientists will take to the streets during the hottest days this summer to map hot spots in ten different U.S. cities. The campaign is part of a NOAA-funded project to map places where buildings, asphalt, and other parts of urban environments can amplify high temperatures, putting people at heightened risk of heat illness during extreme heat events.

Eight cities slated to run Urban Heat Island mapping campaigns in summer 2019 21 June 2019

Eight cities slated to run Urban Heat Island mapping campaigns in summer 2019

Community organizers in eight U.S. cities have been offered support for UHI mapping campaigns through the National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS) and CPO’s Communication, Education, and Engagement Division.

Ready for summer heat? Study finds new primary driver of extreme Texas heat waves 28 June 2018

Ready for summer heat? Study finds new primary driver of extreme Texas heat waves

A team of scientists found that a strengthened change in ocean temperatures from west to east (or gradient) in the tropical Pacific during the preceding winter is the main driver of more frequent heat waves in Texas. 

Climate Resilience Toolkit Publishes New Case Study on Heat Illness Early Warning in the Carolinas 16 March 2018

Climate Resilience Toolkit Publishes New Case Study on Heat Illness Early Warning in the Carolinas

Developing an Early Warning System to Prevent Heat Illness

Residents of the Carolinas are familiar with hot summers, but in some areas excessive heat events bring a higher risk for heat-related illness—and even death. A new tool can help local communities get ahead of heat events so they can reduce risk for their residents.

NOAA Releases Summer Climate Outlook for 2017 6 June 2017

NOAA Releases Summer Climate Outlook for 2017

only the great plains may be spared from above average temperatures

Schools are letting out, Memorial Day is nearly here, and for many Americans that means  the unofficial start of summer. And if it's summer, then it 's time to start paying attention to the risk of extreme heat. According to NOAA’s summer outlook, most of the United States is favored to have a hotter than average summer in 2017. Only in the Great Plains do forecasters think the chances for a cool or a normal summer are equal to the chances of a hot summer. Everywhere else—from Alaska to southern California, and from Maine to Texas—odds are tilted toward well above average warmth. The absolute highest chances for a much warmer than usual summer are in Hawaii. (see the large version of the map below for Hawaii and Alaska.

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Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather.