Drought Task Force Special Collection on Advancing Drought Monitoring and Prediction now available

  • 19 March 2014
  • Number of views: 3656

This special collection of the Journal of Hydrometeorology focuses on scientific research to advance the U.S.'s capability to monitor and predict drought, including the development of new data and methodologies. The results presented in this issue represent the outcomes of research in large part funded by NOAA's Modeling, Analysis, Predictions and Projections (MAPP) program, also leveraging other U.S. agencies' investments, and coordinated within the framework of the MAPP Drought Task Force. The collection includes a Synthesis paper that motivates the research, highlights the main results of the various investigations, and summarizes the remaining challenges and research gaps as well as the prospects for new global scale drought monitoring and prediction systems. The collection is divided broadly into papers addressing monitoring and those addressing the prediction problem, but also includes an important focus on improving our understanding of past droughts. The papers provide a state-of-the-practice / state-of-the-science assessment of the modern drought challenge and efforts to understand and manage it.

Collection Organizers:

Siegfried Schubert and Kingtse Mo, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; and Annarita Mariotti, NOAA Climate Program Office

The journal page can be found here: http://journals.ametsoc.org/page/droughtMonitoring

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Contact

Dr. Annarita Mariotti
MAPP Program Director
P: 301-734-1237
E: annarita.mariotti@noaa.gov

Dr. Daniel Barrie
MAPP Program Manager
P: 301-734-1256
E: daniel.barrie@noaa.gov

Alison Stevens*
MAPP Program Specialist
P: 301-734-1218
E: alison.stevens@noaa.gov

Emily Read*
MAPP Program Assistant
P: 301-734-1257
E: emily.read@noaa.gov

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