Climate Program Office News

New research identifies regions with worsening "snow droughts" around the world 3 August 2020

New research identifies regions with worsening "snow droughts" around the world

Western United States snowmelt deficit found to be of increasing intensity and length in recent years

Snow is used by approximately ⅙ of Earth’s population for drinking, agriculture, and hydropower, among other uses. Despite its importance, “snow droughts,” or deficits in snowmelt, which can have serious regional and global consequences, have been fairly unexplored compared to other forms of drought, until now.

Researchers show consistent upper air temperature trends for the first time, improve understanding 30 July 2020

Researchers show consistent upper air temperature trends for the first time, improve understanding

Obtaining consistent results from data records that span multiple types of observing systems has been challenging, limiting our ability to use the observations and realize their full value.

GHHIN hosts webinar on Dialogues on Heat in the City and in the Workplace 29 July 2020

GHHIN hosts webinar on Dialogues on Heat in the City and in the Workplace

On July 28th and 29th, the Global Heat Health Information Network (GHHIN) hosted discussions on the urgent challenges of extreme heat in urban areas and in occupational settings. The discussions were moderated by Thomson Reuters reporters, and featured experts from government, academia, and industry.

MERT organizes first of series of NOAA Research-Office of National Marine Sanctuaries discussions 29 July 2020

MERT organizes first of series of NOAA Research-Office of National Marine Sanctuaries discussions

These discussions are an early step in achieving the goal of increased connectivity between NOAA Research capabilities and sanctuary climate information needs under CPO's Marine Ecosystems Risk Team (MERT) initiative.

COM Program-funded study helps improve understanding of how climate change may impact ENSO 29 July 2020

COM Program-funded study helps improve understanding of how climate change may impact ENSO

El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-driven variations in sea surface temperatures over the tropical Pacific play a major role in seasonal rainfall changes in the United States and in driving weather and climate around the world. However, little is known about how ENSO will respond to anthropogenic changes in Earth’s climate.

RSS

About the Climate Program Office

The Climate Program Office (CPO) manages competitive research programs in which NOAA funds high-priority climate science, assessments, decision support research, outreach, education, and capacity-building activities designed to advance our understanding of Earth’s climate system, and to foster the application of this knowledge in risk management and adaptation efforts.  CPO-supported research is conducted in regions across the United States, at national and international scales, and globally.  Learn more...

Subscribe-to-newsletter

«August 2020»
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
272829303112
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31123456

CPO HEADQUARTERS

1315 East-West Highway Suite 100
Silver Spring, MD 20910

ABOUT US

Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather.